Welcome to the Cambridge Writers website. Here you will find a little about us and what we do, also profiles of some of our members and some samples of our work.

The login at the corner of this page is to enable contributers to edit their entries from time to time (please apply for password to the webmaster)

Tuesday, 4. Sep 2018

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Anne Atkins

Anne Atkins has written three novels, all with a Cambridge aspect: The Lost Child, On Our Own, and A Fine and Private Place. Her fourth (working title: An Elegant Solution) follows the life of the child protagonist of On Our Own, living in the famous Cambridge College where he sang as a chorister, now working as a Junior Research Fellow in number Theory. Demonstrating to an eager supervisee that, contrary to popular opinion, it is in fact possible to trace the provenance of cryptocurrency (bitcoins), he never thought to uncover such horror...

Photograph by Serena Atkins

Evolution - Short Story Competition 2018

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This year’s short story competition was a considerable success. Beverley Steffert, our Programme Secretary, arranged for it to be judged by the well-known literary agent Julian Friedmann. In his comments he remarked on the generally high standard of entries. He felt Cambridge Writers would be able to outclass any other writing group in the country. High praise indeed! On the basis of this we have now been able to publish all the entries.
 
The competition theme was ‘Freedom’, and entrants came at this theme in a multitude of different ways. The collection has been edited by our secretary, Siobhan Carew, and our Website Administrator, Thure Etzold. We owe them a big vote of thanks. The book is now available from Amazon as e-book or paperback.

Submission schedules for 2017

22. Dec 2016
Tim Love
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With all the competition deadlines and magazine submission windows around nowadays, it helps to plan ahead. Here are some suggestions for the first half of 2017

Bringing philosophers to life

24. Sep 2016
Harry Goode
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The idea for my project came to me when I read about the attempts that Plato made to persuade Dionysius, tyrant of Syracuse, to adopt a better form of government. He continued to attempt this with the tyrant’s son, also called Dionysius, when he succeeded his father. There was also a homo-erotic affair between Plato and Dion, a relative of the tyrants. I thought this would make good longish short story. In fact it grew into a novella of 22,000 words, and I felt that in the course of telling the story I had explained something of Plato’s philosophy.